Sondra Rodgers

American film and television actress (1903–1997)

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Sondra Rodgers
Born
Fenella Jewell Rodgers

February 3, 1903

Died July 22, 1997

Other names Sondra Arleaux
Occupation Actress
Years active 1944 – 1970 (film)

Sondra Rodgers (born Fenella Jewell Rodgers; 1903–1997) was an American film and television actress.[1]

Early years[edit]

Born Fenella Jewell Rodgers,[2] she grew up on the family farm in Trimble County, Kentucky.[3] She was the daughter of J.L. Rodgers[4] and his wife, Lacy Rodgers. When she was 17, she moved to New York and began modeling for a commercial photographer.[3]

Radio[edit]

Rodgers left the stage to work in radio in 1934.[4] She was heard often in the United States on broadcasts of Miniature Theater of the Air and on a number of soap operas.[3]

She also worked in radio in Europe. Although she was employed by Radio Luxembourg, she was based in London. Her programs were recorded and shipped to Luxembourg for broadcast.[4] After concluding her work in Europe, she returned to Kentucky and wrote scripts for WLAP in Lexington.[4]

Stage[edit]

Rodgers’ early acting experience came in New York when she worked (using the name Sondra Arleaux)[4] in stock theater with Jessie Bonstelle. She appeared on Broadway in Riddle Me This (1933).[5]

Rodgers spent time in Europe studying with playwrights, then returned to the United States, where she directed plays at the Pasadena Playhouse with Gilmour Brown as her supervisor.[4]

Later, in Los Angeles, Rodgers acted in plays, including No Time for Comedy, Heaven Can Wait, Cry Havoc, an dFamily Portrait.[3]

Film[edit]

Rodgers signed her first film contract, with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, in May 1944.[6] Her film debut came in Marriage Is a Private Affair (1944).[7]

Television[edit]

Rodgers portrayed Mrs. Appleby in the 1961 episode “A Doctor Comes to Town” of the television series Window on Main Street.[citation needed]. She played the prudish (unnamed) mother of daughters Elmira and Dodie on “Wagon Train” in S1 E18 “The Gabe Carswell Story” which aired 1/14/1958.

Filmography[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1944 Marriage Is a Private Affair Nurse Uncredited
1944 Lost in a Harem Zaida Uncredited
1945 Keep Your Powder Dry WAC Hodgekins
1945 Anchors Aweigh Jean Uncredited
1945 The Hidden Eye Helen Roberts
1946 Up Goes Maisie Uncredited
1946 Easy to Wed Attendant
1946 Boys’ Ranch Mrs. O’Neill Uncredited
1948 Tap Roots Shellie Dabney
1951 As You Were WAC Captain
1963 Tammy and the Doctor First Nurse
1966 Country Boy Mrs. Byrd
1970 Airport Margaret Rogers – Passenger Uncredited, (final film role)

References[edit]

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  1. ^ Erickson p.385
  2. ^ .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit;word-wrap:break-word}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation:target{background-color:rgba(0,127,255,0.133)}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free.id-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited.id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration.id-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription.id-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg”)right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg”)right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}body:not(.skin-timeless):not(.skin-minerva) .mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background-size:contain}.mw-parser-output .cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{color:#d33}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#2C882D;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-night .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}@media(prefers-color-scheme:dark){html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error,html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{color:#f8a397}html.skin-theme-clientpref-os .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{color:#18911F}}McCollum, Konnie (July 2007). “Trimble County native found fame in Hollywood”. RoundAbout. Archived from the original on 12 February 2018. Retrieved 12 February 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d Ransdell, Gail M. (October 2, 1949). “An Old Kentucky Home Is The Setting”. The Courier-Journal. Kentucky, Louisville. p. 77. Retrieved February 11, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  4. ^ a b c d e f “Cabins for 300 Negro slaves used to ring the homestead”. The Courier-Journal. Kentucky, Louisville. October 2, 1949. p. 78. Retrieved February 11, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  5. ^ “(“Sondra Arleaux” search results)”. Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. Archived from the original on 12 February 2018. Retrieved 12 February 2018.
  6. ^ “Lure of Hollywood Proves Too Strong”. The Pittsburgh Press. Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh. May 12, 1944. p. 29. Retrieved February 11, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon
  7. ^ “Screen Newcomer”. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh. August 2, 1944. p. 20. Retrieved February 11, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. Open access icon

Bibliography[edit]

  • Erickson, Hal. Military Comedy Films: A Critical Survey and Filmography of Hollywood Releases Since 1918. McFarland, 2012.

External links[edit]

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